CFP: The Medieval Brain

CFP – The Medieval Brain Workshop, University of York, UK, March 10th and 11th, 2017

Deadline for submissions:  October 21, 2016

 

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Drawing by Santiago Ramón y Cajal of two types of Golgi-stained neurons from the cerebellum of a pigeon

As we research aspects of the medieval brain, we encounter complications generated by medieval thought and twenty-first century medicine and neurology alike. Our understanding of modern-day neurology, psychiatry, disability studies, and psychology rests on shifting sands. Not only do we struggle with medieval terminology concerning the brain, but we have to connect it with a constantly-moving target of modern understanding. Though we strive to avoid interpreting the past using presentist terms, it is difficult – or impossible – to work independently of the framework of our own modern understanding. This makes research into the medieval brain and ways of thinking both challenging and exciting. As we strive to know more about specifically medieval experiences, while simultaneously widening our understanding of the brain today, we much negotiate a great deal of complexity.

In this two-day workshop, to be held at the University of York on Friday 10th and Saturday 11th March 2017 under the auspices of the Centre for Chronic Diseases and Disorders, we will explore the topic of ‘the medieval brain’ in the widest possible sense. The ultimate aim is to provide a forum for discussion, stimulating new collaborations from a multitude of voices on, and approaches to, the theme.

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Confirmed keynote speakers:

Carole Rawcliffe (University of East Anglia)

Corinne Saunders (Durham University)

Jonathan Hsy (George Washington University)

This call is for papers to comprise a series of themed sessions of papers and/or roundtables that approach the subject from a range of different, or an interweaving of, disciplines. Potential topics of discussion might include, but are not restricted to:

Mental health
Neurology
The history of emotions
Disability and impairment
Terminology and the brain
Ageing and thinking
Retrospective diagnosis and the Middle Ages
Interdisciplinary practice and the brain
The care of the sick
Herbals and medieval medical texts
Research that grapples with terminology, combines unconventional disciplinary approaches, and/or sparks debates around the themes is particularly welcome. We will be encouraging diversity, and welcome speakers from all backgrounds, including those from outside of traditional academia. All efforts will be made to ensure that the conference is made accessible to those who are not able to attend through live-tweeting and through this blog.

Please send abstracts of up to 250 words for independent papers, or expressions of interest for roundtable topics/themed paper panels, by Friday 21st October, to Deborah Thorpe at: deborah.thorpe@york.ac.uk or visit the Workshop website at: https://themedievalbrain.wordpress.com/

CFP: Shakespeare 401: What’s Next?

CFP: Shakespeare 401: What’s Next?

2017 Shakespearean Theatre Conference
University of Waterloo with the Stratford Festival: Waterloo, Ontario, Canada (June 22-24, 2017)
Due: 31 January 2017

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An 1870 oil painting by Ford Madox Brown depicting the play’s famous balcony scene

We invite proposals for 20-minute papers, full sessions, and workshops for the second Shakespearean Theatre Conference, to be held June 22-24, 2017. All approaches to Tudor-Stuart drama and its afterlives are welcome. In the wake of the Shakespeare quatercentenary, we especially encourage papers that think broadly and creatively about the future of this drama. How can old plays best speak to the diversity of contemporary identities? What new critical and creative directions seem particularly promising? Which established practices remained indispensable? What — or who — is due for a revival?

Plenary speakers:
Sarah Beckwith (Duke University)
Martha Henry (Stratford Festival)
Peter Holland (University of Notre Dame)
Julia Reinhard Lupton (University of California, Irvine)

The conference is a joint venture of the University of Waterloo and the Stratford Festival, and will bring together scholars and practitioners to talk about how performance influences scholarship and vice versa. Paper sessions will be held at the University of Waterloo’s Stratford campus, with plays and special events hosted by the Stratford Festival. The 2017 season at Stratford will include productions ofTwelfth Night, Romeo and Juliet, Timon of Athens, The Changeling, Tartuffe, The School for Scandal, and The Bakkhai.

By January 31, 2017, please send proposals to Shakespeare@uwaterloo.ca.

 

CFP: Teaching Chaucer’s Tales with Visuals.

Call for papers for the Chaucer MetaPage session at the International Medieval Congress, Kalamazoo, in May 2017

Beyond the Portraits: Teaching Chaucer’s Tales with Visuals

Deadline for Submission: September 15, 2016 

Chaucer MetaPage

Contact: syager@iastate.edu

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The Peasants’ Revolt of 1381 is mentioned in the Tales.CBeyond the Portraits: 

Teaching Chaucer’s Tales with Visuals.

For this session, we seek papers that explore the possibilities of using visual materials to teach the Canterbury Tales, going beyond the Ellesmere portraits and similar highly familiar resources. These resources could be online or off (e.g. photos, underexplored book illustrations, ephemera). The session will emphasize the pedagogical value of these materials.

Poetry at the Post: Reading Poetry in Alphabetical Order or “C” Is For Christian Campbell

AT BUCKINGHAM PALACE*
by Christian Campbell

I

I am the first of my family 
to go to Buckingham Palace.
I had the flu, I nearly stayed home;…

President Barack Obama and First Lady Michelle Obama are welcomed by Her Majesty Queen Elizabeth II to Buckingham Palace in London, April 1, 2009.
President Barack Obama and First Lady Michelle Obama are welcomed by Her Majesty Queen Elizabeth II to Buckingham Palace in London, April 1, 2009.

*From Running the Dusk by Christian Campbell, Peepal Tree Press Ltd., 2010. Running the Dusk gives us a  new voice for Caribbean arts and letters…(Yusef Komunyakaa)

Christian Campbell

Poetry at the Post: John Dryden Translation Competition

Mac Flecknoe
BY JOHN DRYDEN

A Satire upon the True-blue Protestant Poet T.S.

All human things are subject to decay,
And, when Fate summons, monarchs must obey:
This Flecknoe found, who, like Augustus, young
Was call’d to empire, and had govern’d long:
In prose and verse, was own’d, without dispute
Through all the realms of Non-sense, absolute.

(c) National Portrait Gallery, London; Supplied by The Public Catalogue Foundation
(c) National Portrait Gallery, London; Supplied by The Public Catalogue Foundation

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JOHN DRYDEN TRANSLATION COMPETITION

The British Comparative Literature Association organises a translation competition in memory of the first British poet laureate John Dryden (1631–1700), who was a literary critic, translator, and playwright as well as a poet. Sponsored jointly with the British Centre for Literary Translation at the University of East Anglia, the John Dryden Translation Competition awards prizes for unpublished literary translations from any language into English. Literary translation includes poetry, prose, or drama from any period. There are three prizes of £350, £200, and £100; other entries may receive commendations. All three prizes also include one-year BCLA membership.

Prize-winners are announced in the summer on the BCLA website and prizes are presented thereafter every year at the BCLA ‘AGM and Colloquy’. Winning entries are eligible to be published in full on the website, and extracts from winning entries are also eligible for publication in Comparative Critical Studies.

Assisted by competent bilingual readers specialising in the literatures for which entries are received, the judges are selected from the following:

Dr Glyn Hambrook (Senior Lecturer, University of Wolverhampton and Editor, Comparative Critical Studies)

Dr Maike Oergel (Associate Professor, University of Nottingham and Editor, Comparative Critical Studies)

Dr Stuart Gillespie (Reader, University of Glasgow and Founding Editor, Translation and Literature)

Martin Sorrell (Translator)

Robert Chandler (Translator)

For conditions of entry and further details download the John Dryden Translation Competition 2015-2016 Entry Form. The closing date for receipt of entries for 2015-2016 is 16 February 2016.

Entries, each consisting of source text, your translation, an entry form, and the entry fee, should be sent to:

Dr Karen Seago
John Dryden Translation Competition
Department of Culture and Creative Industries
School of Arts and Social Sciences, City University London
London, EC1V 0HB, UK

You may be eligible to submit an entry free of charge; please see the John Dryden Translation Competition 2015-2016 Entry Form for details. Contact DrydenTranslationCompetition@city.ac.uk for more information.