Poetry at the Post: It’s Pool Time! Yes!

The Wading Pool
BY GEORGE BILGERE
The toddlers in their tadpole bodies,
with their squirt guns and snorkels,
their beautiful mommies and inflatable whales,
are still too young to understand
that this is as good as it gets.

Austin, Texas  June 7, 2015 photo by Alice-Catherine Jennings
Austin, Texas
June 7, 2015
photo by Alice-Catherine Jennings

A day at the neighborhood pool screams summer. Everyone’s in a good mood. The kids are electric; the parents can chill; and the singlets’ skin glow.

Born in 1951, George Bilgere has been called the baby boomer’s poet. You can watch a video of Bilgere talking about his poetry here.

Continue reading “Poetry at the Post: It’s Pool Time! Yes!”

Poetry at the Post: 14 Lessons From a Visit to the House of Terror Museum in Budapest with John Donne

April 3, 2015

Good Friday, 1613. Riding Westward
BY JOHN DONNE

This day, when my Soules forme bends toward the East.
There I should see a Sunne, by rising set,
And by that setting endlesse day beget;
But that Christ on this Crosse, did rise and fall,
Sinne had eternally benighted all.

"Budapest Haus des Terrors" by Tbachner - Own work. Licensed under CC BY 3.0 via Wikimedia Commons -
“Budapest Haus des Terrors” by Tbachner – Own work. Licensed under CC BY 3.0 via Wikimedia Commons –

The House of Terror is a museum in Budapest dedicated to the memory of the 50 years of totalitarian rule in Hungary.

Last July, I was in a university program on late antiquity studies and the waning years of the Roman Empire. Hungary had been the empire’s outer eastern limits, or limes. My mind was centuries away from the 20th but as the House of Terror Museum was almost on my doorsteps, I decided to make a visit. One floor is about the Nazis, another the Communists and in the basement are the actual “interrogation rooms” of the Hungarian Secret Police. It’s tough museum to visit.

Today is Good Friday, which in that funny way the mind works, I began to consider “suffering” and those two hours immersed in tales of persecution at this chilling museum.

Today’s NAPOWRIMO prompt is about the number 14 so I wrote a poem entitled “14 Lessons From a Visit to the House of Terror Museum.” Here are the first few lines:

 

14 Lessons From a Visit to the House of Terror Museum
Budapest, Hungary
July 2014

 
2. Peasants

 
anyone could be named a “kulak” —a public enemy,
 
the hunters’ prey

 

 

A portrait of Donne as a young man, c. 1595, artist unknown, in the collection of the National Portrait Gallery, London
A portrait of Donne as a young man, c. 1595, artist unknown, in the collection of the National Portrait Gallery, London

But that Christ on this Crosse, did rise and fall,
Sinne had eternally benighted all.
Yet dare I’almost be glad, I do not see
That spectacle of too much weight for mee.

Poetry at the Post: It’s a Coronation!

A Crown of Autumn Leaves
BY ANNIE FINCH

Holding past summer’s hold,
Open and strong,
One of the leaves in the crown is gold…

"Buda Castles-Matthias Church". Licensed under Creative Commons Attribution-Share Alike 2.5 via Wikimedia Commons
“Buda Castles-Matthias Church”. Licensed under Creative Commons Attribution-Share Alike 2.5 via Wikimedia Commons

A cool front moving through the West Texas desert makes me think of autumn.

Yet, it is summer. And, it was in the summer of 1867 when Emperor Franz Joseph and his wife, Empress Elisabeth, were crowned King and Queen of Hungary at St. Matthias Church in Budapest.

This was quite the event. The Coronation was one of the most spectacular pageants on the Continent and covered extensively in the papers of Paris and London.

The royal carriage covered
with gems and gold & drawn
by eight white horses, 182
aristocrats elegantly dressed,
a grand procession, maidens
in white with flowers..
St Stephen’s Crown
on a velvet cushion,
five days of banquets…

Even a special Coronation Mass was composed by famous Hungarian Franz Liszt. Here is a selection:

Liszt’s “Benedictus, the invocation for divine help and guidance, is rhythmic and trance-like, similar to a chant.

Annie Finch’s poem, “A Crown of Autumn Leaves” is from her book Calendars, a book of poems organized around ritual chants and the seasons.

This poem is so lovely with the repetition of the vowel sounds. The “o” summons the circling of the crown of fallen leaves.

Here is my crown
Of winding vine,
Of leaves that dropped,
That fingers twined,
another crown
to yield and shine

The crown of leaves shines…but like the King and Queen of Hungary, so soon it is nevermore.

Poetry at the Post: Life in a Roman Villa, The Seuso Treasure

“The Roman Villa” by Mervyn Lagden

Not only sheepmen, weavers, craftsmen
Lie under the Cotswald turf…

Seuso Hunting Plate in the  Hungarian Parliament Building Photo by Derzsi Elekes Andor - Own work CC by SA 3.0
Seuso Hunting Plate in the Hungarian Parliament Building
Photo by Derzsi Elekes Andor – Own work CC by SA 3.0

The story behind the Seuso Treasure, fourteen Roman-era silver worth perhaps as much as $200 million, is prime material for a blockbuster movie. Discovered more than 30 years ago, this treasure has been involved in a series of sales and acquisitions, illegal intrigue and possibly three murders.

Lake Balaton, July 2014
Lake Balaton, July 2014

When Sotheby’s put this treasure up for sale in New York in 1990, three countries came forward to claim ownership: Croatia, Hungary, and Lebanon.

Archeological features, however, indicate that the silver most likely was part of a 4th century Roman Villa in the Balaton region of modern day Hungary. (“Contributions to the Archeology of the Seuso Treasure” by Zsolt Visy)

Part now of the upland the the tools they used…

Roman Ruins Lake Balaton Region, July 2014
Roman Ruins Lake Balaton Region, July 2014

Early this year, seven pieces of this ancient Roman silver treasure were repatriated to Budapest with the logistical help of the Hungarian Counter Terrorism Center.

Penates and coloured pavements, ivory pins
And fingers that held them—warm brown mesh
Under the roots and the rabbit gins,

Poetry at the Post-Pécs: Roman Limes, An Almond Tree

[Record no oiled tongue, diary]
BY DAN BEACHY-QUICK

Note the almond
Tree overmuch with fruit. The almond
Pressed is oil sweet.

From the the ancient city of Aquincum,
the borders of Pannonia, across the limes,
the limits of the Rome, onward
to the Carpathian Basin of Pécs,
we traveled—
thirty-some seekers
of the ruins.

…Do you hear?
That pulse?

A whirl of images
the press of heat
the cool of blue
and the tree
of almonds…
dropping nuts
like bones.

Infinite
In store the game of this land.

Poetry at the Post-Budapest: Fever 103°, A Heat Wave Is Coming!

Fever 103°
BY SYLVIA PLATH

One scarf will catch and anchor in the wheel,
Such yellow sullen

I bought a new yellow scarf…

“A heat wave is coming to Budapest!” That is what the sales clerk told me.

… & then a white blouse,cool.

“It will be oppressive,” she said. “Close to 40. The heat will just sit in the air.”

…They will not rise,
But trundle round the globe
Choking the aged and the meek,

Oppression,
border shifts
regime changes.

I’ve taken
to touching
buildings,
to feel
the shifts
of salt, of grit,
the cleansings.

In the end, whenever or wherever we lived or live, we must find the “I.”

The beads of hot metal fly, and I love, I

Poetry at the Post-Budapest: Meditations on Marcus Aurelius

“Marcus Aurelius Rose”
BY LISA JARNOT

From the five good emperors
I have learned that there were five good emperors,

A trip to Aquincum, the ruins of an ancient city in Budapest, can lead one to other places. For me, the road circled back Marcus Aurelius, the Roman emperor who perhaps wrote a part of his book Meditations at Aquincum

“Whatever happens to you has been waiting to happen since the beginning of time. The twining strands of fate wove both of them together: your own existence and the things that happen to you.” (V. 8, trans. Gregory Hays)

“Soon you’ll be ashes or bones. A mere name at most—and even that is just a sound, an echo. The things we want in life are empty, stale, trivial” (V. 33, trans. Gregory Hays)

Remnants of antiquity remind me of the brevity of life. Breathe it in …hold it. And, then read this lovely poem by Lisa Jarnot.

From the window blinds, from the sun decayed,
from the heart, a brimming record braised and turned
.