Poetry at the Post: Seeing Green in Oaxaca

The Ivy Green
BY CHARLES DICKENS
Oh, a dainty plant is the Ivy green,
That creepeth o’er ruins old!
Of right choice food are his meals, I ween,
In his cell so lone and cold.
The wall must be crumbled, the stone decayed,
To pleasure his dainty whim:
And the mouldering dust that years have made
Is a merry meal for him.
Creeping where no life is seen,
A rare old plant is the Ivy green…

Oaxaca, Mexico August 2015
Oaxaca, Mexico
August 2015

And nations have scattered been;
But the stout old Ivy shall never fade,
From its hale and hearty green.
The brave old plant, in its lonely days,
Shall fatten upon the past:
For the stateliest building man can raise,
Is the Ivy’s food at last.
Creeping on, where time has been,
A rare old plant is the Ivy green.

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Poetry at the Post: La Conquista, Evangelization & “The Conqueror Worm”

The Conqueror Worm
BY EDGAR ALLAN POE
…The curtain, a funeral pall,
Comes down with the rush of a storm,
While the angels, all pallid and wan,
Uprising, unveiling, affirm
That the play is the tragedy, “Man,”
And its hero, the Conqueror Worm.

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I’ve been thinking about the Spanish Conquest, the “christianizing” of the New World and Edgar Allen Poe—a poet held dear by many writers in Mexico. A curious thing—but perhaps because of his Gothic and macabre style.

In 1835, Poe, then 26, married his 13-year-old cousin, Virginia Clemm. They were married for eleven years until her early death, which may have inspired some of his writing.
In 1835, Poe, then 26, married his 13-year-old cousin, Virginia Clemm. They were married for eleven years until her early death, which may have inspired some of his writing.

Poetry at the Post: The Olmec Colossus Heads—Which One Is Your Favorite?

The New Colossus
BY EMMA LAZARUS
Not like the brazen giant of Greek fame,
With conquering limbs astride from land to land;

Monument 4 from La Venta with comparative size of an adult and child. The monument weighs almost 20 tons
Monument 4 from La Venta with comparative size of an adult and child. The monument weighs almost 20 tons

August 4, 2015:
@Benito Juárez Autonomous University of Oaxaca

This week in art history, we’re taking a look at the colossus Olmec heads.

So far, 17 have been discovered. My favorite is No. 9.

Not only did I learn about the colossus heads today but now I know where the lines “Give me your tired, your poor/,Your huddled masses yearning to breathe free,…” engraved on the pedestal of The Statue of Liberty came from. Emma Lazarus!

Poetry at the Post: Reading “Kind of Blue” in Oaxaca

Kind of Blue
BY LYNN POWELL

Not Delft or
delphinium, not Wedgewood
among the knickknacks, not wide-eyed chicory
evangelizing in the devil strip—

“Delph 1” by Darorcilmir – Own work. Licensed under CC BY-SA 3.0 via Wikimedia Commons –
Textiles of Oaxaca San Pablo Cultural Center  July 2015
Textiles of Oaxaca
San Pablo Cultural Center
July 2015

not the long-legged hunger
of a heron or the peacock’s
iridescent id—

A leucistic Indian peacock Photo courtesy of Felix Potuit
A leucistic Indian peacock
Photo courtesy of Felix Potuit