Poetry at the Post: 1215—A Very Good Year!

The Stag at Eve
BY LESLEY JENIKE
In my cries I don’t cease (some dumb bird)
when from the swinging trees a stag at eve

comes prancing, body dappled by the shadows
of dripping leaves…

King John on a stag hunt.
King John on a stag hunt.

Midwest Medieval History Conference

October 9–10, 2015
Indiana State University, Terre Haute

CALL FOR PAPERS!

It Was A Very Good Year: The Impact of 1215 on the Medieval World

Keynote Speaker: Professor Richard Helmholz, University of Chicago

The year 1215 will be known forever among medieval historians for two groundbreaking events, the Fourth Lateran Council of Pope Innocent III and the creation of Magna Carta by the barons rebelling against King John of England.

Pope Innocent III wearing a Y-shaped pallium.
Pope Innocent III wearing a Y-shaped pallium.

MMHC welcomes papers on any topic of medieval history, especially proposals for papers on topics relevant to the theme of the impact of 1215. In addition, we welcome paper proposals focusing on the debate surrounding the notion of the development of a “persecuting society” in medieval Europe especially after 1215.

Please send abstract (300 words maximum) via email attachment to Linda Mitchell, Program Chair, mitchellli@umkc.edu. Deadline for paper proposals: June 30, 2015.

For information about the conference or local arrangements, please email local host, Steve Stofferahn (Steven.Stofferahn@indstate.edu) and/or program chair, Linda Mitchell (mitchellli@umkc.edu).

The Magna Carta (originally known as the Charter of Liberties) of 1215, written in iron gall ink on parchment in medieval Latin, using standard abbreviations of the period, authenticated with the Great Seal of King John. The original wax seal was lost over the centuries.[1] This document is held at the British Library and is identified as
The Magna Carta (originally known as the Charter of Liberties) of 1215, written in iron gall ink on parchment in medieval Latin, using standard abbreviations of the period, authenticated with the Great Seal of King John. The original wax seal was lost over the centuries.[1] This document is held at the British Library and is identified as “British Library Cotton MS Augustus II.106

And, if you’d like to know more about Lesley Jenike—today’s poet, click here. “The Stag of Eve” —I like it!

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